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Full text of "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation presents watercolours and unrivalled collages by Hilla Rebay : This collection, the work of thirty-eight years, is being exhibited by public request, November-December 1948"

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HILLA REBAY 




CONFUOCO (1946) 



11 x 14, Watercolour 



MUSEUM OF NON-OBJECTIVE PAINTING 
1071 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK 28, N. Y. 




HILLA REBAY 1 947 



The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation presents watercolours 
and unrivalled collages by Hi Ha Rebay. This collection, the 
work of thirty-eight years, is being exhibited by public request. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1948 



THE MUSEUM OF NON-OBJECTIVE PAINTING 



INTRODUCTION 



The present exhibition of watercoiours and collages by H ilia Rebay is 
only the latest of a long series of one-man shows by this artist in the 
important cities of the world. 

In Strassburg, Alsace, where she was born, Hilla Rebay began to draw 
portraits as a child of six, and at the age of eleven, she accomplished 
her first excellent portrait in oil. Her drawings were called Holbein-like 
by the greatest of academic masters, E. V. Gebhard, Duesseldorf. Her 
formal art education began when she was not yet sixteen, at the Acad- 
emies of Duesseldorf and Paris, where she received several first prizes. 
In 1913, her paintings were exhibited at the Salon des Independents in 
Paris. In 1914 and 1915, after exhibiting in the free Secession in Berlin, 
she exhibited at the Munich Spring Secession, and was accepted even 
in the Summer Secession of Munich, which had the most difficult of all 
juries to pass. In 1915, after exhibiting in Switzerland, she was invited 
to show at the "Sturm," Berlin, by Herwarth Walden; who was the first 
promoter of Leger, Gleizes, Delaunay, Metzinger, Chagall, Kandinsky, 
Marc, Klee and Bauer, as well as of all the other prominent painters of 
our time. There she had a one-man show. 

In 1918, Hilla Rebay became a member of the "November Gruppe," 
and exhibited with them each year, until she was a member of the 
exclusive "Krater" group. From 1923 to 1927, she lived and exhibited 
in Rome and Paris, until she was invited to America, where her first show 
was at the Worcester Museum in 1927. Following that, she had several 
one-man shows in New York: one at the Marie Sterner and two at the 
Wildenstein Galleries. During the same years and later on, her paper 
paintings, negro drawings and non-objective paintings were exhibited 
in Parisian one-man shows at the Galerie Carmine and at Bernheim 
Jeune, Paris, several times. In the Salon de Tuileries and at the Salon 
d'Autumne, she exhibited in the group with Gleizes and Delaunay in 
1937 and 1938. 

Her greatest admirer was Felix Feneon, the foremost of French art 
experts, who considered her the greatest woman painter and who 
honored her by having her paper paintings above his desk, before 
his seat in his dining room, as well as opposite his bed, and who in many 
letters, until he died, implored her to paint, instead of working for other 
artists. It was Hilla Rebay, who was chiefly responsible for the first Salon 
for Non-Objective Painting in Paris, in the Palais des Beaux Arts, opened 
by the President of France in 1947, in which the American group oc- 



cupied the Hall of Honour, and which group created such a sensation, 
that it continues to be spoken of in Paris as extraordinary. 

Such famous art critics as Andre Salmon and the late Ivanhoe Rambasson, 
who was honorary curator of all museums of France, often wrote of her 
art and called her the creator of the school of collage of Paris; since her 
shows stimulated many artists to try cutting in coloured papers, even 
lines, only to find out how difficult it is, to create art in this medium, 
and especially an atmosphere and rhythm. 

As a painter, Hilla Rebay progressed through the several phases of 
painting by way of academism, expressionism, cubism, and abstraction; 
she finally attained fulfillment in Non-Objectivity. This, she considers 
the sole expression of Art for the coming "rhythmic spiritual era," 
which is so much in contrast to the bygone epochs of materialistic static 
reproduction. A procession of painting which, though increasing in 
quality of workmanship and volume, embodied no spiritual advance, 
since the time of the caveman's first imitative wall designs. 

Besides being a painter, Hilla Rebay has long been a collector of the 
work by such great masters as Kandinsky and Bauer, as well as that of 
Gleizes, Seurat, Leger, Klee, Chagall, Delaunay, and others. Her earliest 
collection and some of her own works, including many of her superb 
paperplastics, were combined in 1937 with the collection of Solomon 
R. Guggenheim, to provide the nucleus of the permanent collection of 
the Museum of Non-Objective Painting. 

But, even since 1937, she has not missed any opportunity to collect, 
especially the works by Kandinsky, whom she considers with Rudolf 
Bauer, the greatest master of creative painting of all time. To see this 
collection, especially of Kandinsky, so rare in quality and choice, is a 
must for any well-informed art expert. Some of this collection, part of 
which arrived from her European estate, now comprises paintings also by 
Domela, Moholy, Modigliano, Leger, Gleizes, Chagall, Mondrian, Seurat, 
Valmier, Gildewart, Xceron, Nebel, as well as many fine American non- 
objective painters' works. Many of these masters would have been 
ignored or in bitter need, without her help and foresight but neglected, 
such as Rembrandt was, when he lay dying in the poorhouse, because he 
too was above fashion and commercial-minded interests. It is already 
evident that in the future, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation col- 
lection will need no exchanges nor eliminations, because of the remark- 
able judgment with which its paintings have been chosen. The unending 
appeal and variety of contrasts in creative paintings, of rhythmical life 
and spiritual content, are beyond the outdated static ideal of the materi- 
alistic past, and present the rhythmic form ideal of the future. The silly 
search for a loose brush stroke as well, with which so many self-elected, 



so-called art experts of today clutter their vision, ever since they so 
unanimously had missed Rembrandt, Seurat and Van Gogh as well, 
whose real essential was their research and basic knowledge of con- 
structive pictorial law. This, however, was always overlooked by all 
hunters for the materialistic sensualities of the brush stroke, who are 
equally unable to realize the importance of rhythmic advance, leadership 
of which belongs to America's very nature. There these rhythmic artistic 
qualities of an invisible or visionary reality are not only created, studied 
and searched for, but recognized as much needed practical modern life 
essentials, of help and influence to betterment. Not only by the steel 
magnate or by the window displayer or the commercial advertiser, 
the engine builder, the dancer, but also by educators, the physician, 
the prison authority, as well as by teachers; so as to mention only a few 
who to this art attribute utility, never contributed to any objecive (now 
outdated) static painting and who have sent enthusiastic letters and 
reports to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. 

It is the rhythm, which is between the forms that creates the infinity of 
life in these creative non-objective paintings. This rhythmic element is 
obvious in Hilla Rebay's paintings, as also the perfection of balance, 
which is so especially outstanding in the work of Rudolf Bauer, the 
greatest painter of all time, as his work is marked by the sublime austerity 
of rhythm. Influential art like this develops in the onlooker reverence to 
the visionarily perceived realities of all spiritual dimensions and essences, 
about which Hilla Rebay has written and taught so much. To support 
and present this great master Bauer, Hilla Rebay has unselfishly devoted 
endless efforts of protection and many kinds of sacrifices, ever since 
she met him in the Sturm in Berlin in 1916. While introducing these two 
artists to each other, the visionary pioneer Herwarth Wolden, suddenly 
inspired, loudly exclaimed: "A historical moment." This has already 
become evident. 

The present exhibition of Hilla Rebay's watercolours shows 254 selected 
paintings and paper collages retrospectively to 1913. It has a double 
interest, since these small works are in such contrast to her huge oil 
paintings. These watercolours are really watercolours at their best, and 
no other non-objective painter has brought out watercolours with such 
powerful intensity without loosing the design. The collages show a 
finesse of design and of texture, which has never been done before and 
probably can never be rivalled. The versatility of this great artist is 
astounding, as she is known for her powerful, dramatic, if not tender 
and lyrical non-objective oil paintings with their exquisite colours, their 
inventiveness, their powerful rhythm of motives and contrasts. Which 
have created the enthusiasm of connoisseurs, wherever they have been 
seen. However, like all really great artists, Hilla Rebay is far too busy 



at work, to exhibit often or to promote her own fame, but often she has 
arranged group exhibitions of American artists, whom she has unselfishly 
taught and financed for many years. Her courage in helping totally 
unknown painters is rare indeed, especially for a museum director. She 
arranged the first group exhibition of American painters in Europe 
since the war, an exhibition which has proved a sensation in Paris and 
Switzerland, and which still is touring in Germany. And all this by a 
woman who is known, to the many, who write to her from all over the 
world, only as an art writer, editor, lecturer and museum director, and 
who is one of the world's foremost artistic figures of our time. Ever since 
1911 she was a helping friend to great painters, neglected, today as 
always, and the pioneer promoter of this extraordinary creative non- 
objective new form ideal, with its practical usefulness to mankind. 
This has been certified in thousands of public comments, now on 
record in the Museum of Non-Objective Painting; comments of great 
importance as testimony to the public's response to this great Art and its 
usefulness. Also, Hilla Rebay's forceful leadership in museum arrange- 
ment and organization, as well as in the presentation and display of 
art, have become famous in the international world of Art. Her vision 
and indubitable courage are based on forty-five years of study, ex- 
perience, and knowledge. Already as a young girl she proved her 
foresight when she bought, with her pocket money of five or ten dollars, 
paintings by the then totally unknown, ridiculed Van Gogh and Gauguin. 

Hilla Rebay certainly never feared the fate which confronted her, like 
all pioneers, that of being misunderstood and attacked, and she was 
especially indifferent to it in 1913, when, working all alone in Alsace- 
Lorraine, unaware of the non-objective theories of Kandinsky and of 
his work, she openly declared reproductive art as mere skill, and dis- 
carded her own renown for such skill (though already considered a 
master of it in Paris) and started out all by herself, the unending study 
of non-objective creative painting's counterpoint. Realizing its extraordi- 
nary influence and importance for the future of mankind, as the only 
possibility to bring rhythmic order into the individual, thereby developing 
his visionary and spiritual faculties and therefore the only possibility 
for achieving international peace, which must be based on the individuals. 
Therefore, it is no wonder that Hilla Rebay is truly the foremost art figure 
of our day; and that famous European art-historians continually proffer 
requests for permission to write the rich and fascinating story of her 
life, and about her devotion to the best in Art, which has been found to 
be the painting of non-objective creation. 

ELISE RUFFINI 

Asst. Professor of Art 
Teachers College 
Columbia University 




LARGO (1946) 



10 ft. xlOft., Oil 



Of Hilla Rebay's paintings in the 1948 Exhibition in 
the Salon de Realites Nouvelles, at the Palais des 
Beaux Arts in Paris, one of which is reproduced 
above, Rene Massat wrote in "Le Courier des Arts 
et des Sciences," August 1948: 



"Hilla Rebay, who animated the group of Non- 
Objective painters in New York, and also organized 
the collection and the Museum of Non-Objective 
Painting sponsored by the Solomon R. Guggenheim 
Foundation, reveals in her remarkable contributions 
the sensitive mentality and mind of the great artist 
she is, and who has written: 'The Non-Objective 
painter is the prophet of the spiritual era. Those who 
have experienced the benefit of this art derive a 
spiritual wealth, which to them can never be lost.' " 



Many French artwriters and critics wrote about H ilia Rebay . . . 
"Mme. Hilla Rebay is the virtuoso of cutting out and creator of the School 
of Collage in Paris. Her success is great and legitime." 

Andre Salmon 
"Revue de France" 



"Hilla Rebay knows it well. These are creations of Quality.' 



Andree Warnot 
'Comoedia Paris" 



"Mme. Rebay solves the difficult problem to create harmony and better 
still an atmosphere." 

Louis Vauxelles 
"Excelsior Paris" 



"Hilla Rebay under the auspices of Felix Feneon gives us a penetrant 
perception and expresses profoundly elementary being." 

Waldemar George 
"La Patria Paris" 



"What art has this young woman— what avalanche of talent." 

Charles de Viel 
"Le Mont Parnasse" 



'Miss Hilla Rebay professes the absolute in Art, a fabulous world, riots 
of colours, which however, never confuse, equally great fantasy her 
exacting imagination finds it solidity in the design." 

P. Beam 
"Pan's" 




:I§18^C<% 



,-v \.Cf- 




BLACK LINES (1948) 



7 x 10, Watercolour 




DARK ACCENT (1948) 



7x10, Watercolour 



10 




10 x 8, Collage 



11 




FUGUETTE (1945) 



12 x 13, Watercolour 




INTERWOVEN (1948) 



7 x 10, Watercolour 



12 




LIBERO (1948) 



9x11, Watercolour 




FLOATING (1939) 





19 x 15, Collage 



ALLEGRO (1939) 



19 x 15, Collage 



13 




IMPROVISATION (1922) 11x8, Watercolour 




SCHERZO (1924) 
14 



11 x 8, Watercolour 



LISTING COL 

1. WOOD CUT 

2. WOOD CUT 

3. WATERCOLOUR 

4. WATERCOLOUR 

5. WATERCOLOUR 

6. WATERCOLOUR 

7. WATERCOLOUR 

8. WATERCOLOUR 

9. COLLAGE 

10. WATERCOLOUR 

11. WATERCOLOUR 

12. WATERCOLOUR 

13. COLLAGE 

14. WATERCOLOUR 

15. WATERCOLOUR 

16. DRAWING 

17. COLLAGE 

18. COMPOSITION 

19. COLLAGE 

20. COLLAGE 

21. COLLAGE 

22. COLLAGE 

23. COLLAGE 

24. COLLAGE 

25. COLLAGE 

26. WATERCOLOUR 

27. COLLAGE 

28. WATERCOLOUR 

29. WATERCOLOUR 

30. WATERCOLOUR 

31. COLLAGE 

32. OIL 



LAGES AND PAINTINGS 



(1911 
(1911 
(1913 
(1914 
(1914 
(1914 
(1914 
(1914 
(1915 
(1915 
(1915 
(1916 
(1916 
(1916 
(1916 
(1916 
(1916 
(1916 
(1916 

(1916 
(1916 

(1916 

(1916 
(1916 
(1916 

(1916 
(1916 

(1916 
(1917 
(1917 
(1917 
(1917 



4x7 

4x8 

8i/ 4 xl9 

33/ 4 x6 

3i/ 2 x5 

33/ 4 x6 

63/ 4 x9 

33/ 4 x6 

8'/ 2 xll 

i2y 2 x9y 4 

8'/ 4 xl23/ 4 
4'/ 2 x6 

8y 4 xioy 2 

T/gx6% 

7y 2 xio 
iix8y 2 

4y 4 x33/ 4 

4x7 

8x7 

10%x8y 2 

33/ 4 x5i/ 2 

6y 2 x9'/ 2 

5y 8 x73/ 4 

4x6 

5'/8x5'/g 

7y 2 xio 

4y 2 x6'/ 4 

83/ 4 xll 

4'/ 2 x33/ 4 
5'/ 4 x5y 2 
5x63/ 4 
4y 4 x53/ 4 



INK 
INK 



COLLAGE 

COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 

COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 



33. OIL 


(1917) 


4y 2 x53/ 4 




34. COLLAGE 


(1917) 


4x4'/ 2 




35. COLLAGE 


(1918) 


9x9 




36. COLLAGE 


(1918) 


3'/ 8 x5y 2 




37. WATERCOLOUR 


(1918) 


2x4 




38. WATERCOLOUR 


(1918) 


2x3 




39. COLLAGE 


(1919) 


8y 2 xll 




40. COLLAGE 


(1920) 


4%xl0 




41. SCHERZO 


(1924) 


83/ 4 xll 


COLLAGE 


42. FUGUE 


(1924) 


9'/ 2 xl3 


COLLAGE 


43. NEGRO GIRL 


(1937) 


10x12 


'ENCIL DRAWING 


44. ERECT 


(1937) 


17xl3'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


45. COMPOSITION 


(1938) 


17xl3y 2 


COLLAGE 


46. GREEN THEME 


(1938) 


17x133/, 


COLLAGE 


47. REGRETS 


(1938) 


llx8V 2 


COLLAGE 


48. FIGURE 


(1939) 


13i/ 2 xl7 


COLLAGE 


49. COMPOSITION 


(1939) 


17xl3'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


50. BOULLY 


(1939) 


173/ 4 xl33/ 4 


COLLAGE 


51. FUGUE, 








INTENSITY 


(1939) 


17xl3'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


52. FUGUE 


(1939) 


17x13% 


COLLAGE 


53. DISTANT 


(1939) 


13y 2 xl7 


COLLAGE 


54. GRAY IN GRAY 


(1939) 


13'/ 2 xl7 


COLLAGE 


55. COUNTERFUGUE 


(1939) 


13'/ 2 xl7y 4 


COLLAGE 


56. FLOATING 


(1939) 


17x13% 


COLLAGE 


57. POINT AND LINE 


(1939) 


13'/ 2 xl7 


COLLAGE 


58. LYRICAL 








INVENTION 


(1939) 


17xl3'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


59. VERTICAL 


(1939) 


17xl3'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


60. DELICATE 


(1939) 


17'/ 4 xl33/ 4 


COLLAGE 


61. ALLEGRO 


(1939) 


17x13% 


COLLAGE 


62. PINKNESS 


(1939) 


9x11% 


COLLAGE 


63. CENTERED 








COMPOSITION 


(1939) 


9x1 iy 4 


COLLAGE 


64. COMPOSITION 


(1939) 


5'/ 8 x6y 2 


COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 


65. RHYTHMIC 


(1940) 


13i/ 2 xl0% 


COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 




COUNTER FUGUE (1939) 17 x 13, Collage 





UPWARD (1938) 



17 x 13, Collage 




66. COMPOSITION 

67. BLUE ACCENT 

68. PIZZICATO 

69. VERA 

70. BLUE MOTIF 

71. ASCENDING 
#A9 

72. PIZZICATO 

73. ALLEGRO 

74. CONTRASTS 

75. VIVACE 

76. WATERCOLOUR 

77. PIZZICATO 

78. LIGHT 

79. EXPRESSIVO 

80. PURPLE FORM 

81. FUGUETTO 

82. PIZZICATO 

83. SCHERZO #3 

84. IN GRAY 

85. ANIMATO 

86. RONDINO 

87. ANDANTINO 

88. COMPOSITION 

#14 

89. COLLAGE -8 

90. VIVACE 

91. TENDERNESS 

92. LENTO 

93. FUGUETTO 

94. CIRCLE 

95. WHITE COMET 

96. YELLOW SQUARE 

97. LEADING ON 

98. ANDANTE 



(1940) 17y 2 xl0'/ 2 

(1941) 13y 4 xll 
(1943) 8'/ 2 xll 
(1943) 8'/ 2 xll 
(1943) 1 1 xl3'/ 2 

(1943) IT 3/ 4 x9 

(1944) 9x12 

(1944) ioy 2 xi3y 2 

(1944) 12x16 

(1944) 9x12 

(1944) 12x16 

(1944) 10'/ 2 xl4i/ 2 

(1944) 10x13 

(1944) 11x14 

(1944) llxl5'/ 2 

(1944) 10y 4 x73/ 4 

(1944) 11x14 

(1944) 8'/ 2 xll'/ 2 

(1944) ll'/ 2 xl4 

(1944) ll'/ 2 xl5y 2 

(1944) 10y 4 x63/ 4 

(1944) 193/ 4 xl33/ 4 



(1944) 
(1944) 
(1944) 
(1944) 
(1944) 
(1944) 
(1944) 
(1944) 
(1944) 
(1945) 
(1945) 



13'/ 2 xll 

12'/ 4 x8 

113/ 4 x8 

lli/ 2 x83/ 4 

8x9% 

7y 2 xll 

ny 2 x9 

103/ 4 xl3 
9y 4 x73/ 4 
15xl93/ 4 
9x12 



WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 
AND CRAYON 

WATERCOLOUR 
AND CRAYON 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 
AND CRAYON 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 



WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 



99. PIZZICATO 

100. LARGO 

101. PRISMATIC 

102. WITHIN A 
CIRCLE 

103. RED CIRCLE 

#2 

104. RED AND GREEN 

105. LARGO 

106. CON MOTO 

107. ANDANTE #D 

108. FUGUETTA 

109. LENTO 

110. CROSS 

111. ROUND ACCENTS 

112. RED CIRCLE 

113. BLUE FORM 

114. CON FUOCO 

115. RED LINES 

116. TWO YELLOW 
TRIANGLES 

117. POINTED 

118. LOVELY BLACK 

119. RED FORM 

120. NOCTURNE 

121. CIRCLES 

122. CIRCLES 

123. FUGUETTO 

124. TRIANGLE 
MOTIVE 

125. PRESTO #1 

126. COLLAGE #1 

127. LEGGERO 

128. PRESTO #2 

129. GREEN RED 
PURPLE 

130. CONTRASTS 



(1945) 143/ 4 xl0 WATERCOLOUR 

(1945) ll'/ 2 x9 WATERCOLOUR 

(1945) 13i/ 2 xl0 WATERCOLOUR 

(1945) 13'/ 4 xl0y 4 WATERCOLOUR 



(1945) 113/ 4 x9 

(1945) 7x10 

(1945) 19'/ 2 xl3y 2 

(1945) ll%x8% 

(1945) 11x10 

(1945) 9x8 

(1945) 13y 4 xl0 

(1945) ll'/ 2 x83/ 4 

(1945) 10y 2 x9 

(1945) 8x8% 

(1946) 12x15 
(1946) 11x14 
(1946) 9x8'/ 4 

(1946) 7y 2 x5'/ 2 

(1946) liy 4 x83/ 4 

(1946) 18xliy 2 

(1946) 13y 2 xlO 

(1946) 9x12 

(1947) 8x9'/ 2 
(1947) 12x16 
(1947) 7x10 



WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 



(1947) 12x18 WATERCOLOUR 

(1947) 12'/ 2 xl9 COLLAGE 

(1947] 15'/ 2 xl9 COLLAGE 

(1947) 15'/ 2 xl9 COLLAGE 

(1947 15'/ 2 xl9 COLLAGE 




CON BRIO (1931) 9x 8, Walercolour 



(1947) 83/ 4 xll'/ 2 
(1947) 8'/ 2 xll 



WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 




TWO RINGS (1939) 1 7 x 1 3, Collage 



17 







GRAY IN GRAY (1939) 17 x 13, Collage 



;h 



INTENSITY (1939) 



^ 



17 x 13, Collage 



131. LARGO 

132. CIRCLE 

133. GREEN ACCENTS 

134. TWO RINGS 

135. FANTASY 

136. CURVED 

137. GLOWING 

138. STRENGTH 
THROUGH JOY 

139. IMPROVISATION 

140. FUGUETTA 

141. SCHERZANDO 

142. BLUE CIRCLE 

143. THREE CIRCLES 

144. POINTED AND 
STRAIGHT 

145. IMPROVISATION 

146. TWO CIRCLES 

147. RED POINT 

148. RED AND GREEN 

149. YELLOW CROSS 

150. ANCHE 

151. RED SQUARE 

152. BLUE CIRCLE 

153. INTERMEZZO 

154. BLACK LINES 

155. DARK ACCENTS 

156. CREATION 

157. RECTANGLE 

158. SOMBRE NOTE 

159. BLACK CROSS 

160. PAPERPLASTIC 

161. PAPERPLASTIC 

162. PAPERPLASTIC 

163. THREE SMALL 
CIRCLES 

164. PIZZICATO 



(1947) 10x7 

(1947) 7y 4 x7y 2 

(1947) 91/4x91/4 

(1947) 93/ 4 xl23/ 4 

(1947) 13'/ 2 xl0'/ 4 

(1947) 133/ 4 xl0 

(1947) 7x10 

(1947) 71/4x71/4 

(1947) 7'/ 2 x7 

(1947) 12x9'/ 4 

(1947) 113/4x8% 

(1947) 83/ 4 xll'/ 2 

(1947) 83/ 4 xll 



(1947) 

(1947) 

(1947) 

(1947) 

(1947) 

(1947) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 

(1948) 



13x10 

9x1 iy 2 

7'/ 2 x73/ 4 

9i/ 2 x8 

8x12 

liy 2 xl4 

7x10 

7x10 

7x10 

7x1 oy 2 

7xl0'/ 2 

7x10 

llxl3'/ 2 

6'/ 2 xll 

15xl9'/ 2 

10y 2 xl3 

7x10 

9'/ 2 x6'/ 2 

8y 4 xioy 2 



(1948) 15x18 
(1948) 10x11 



WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
COLLAGE 
COLLAGE 
COLLAGE 

WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 



165. ANIMATED 










CONTRASTS 


(1948) 


17xlli/ 2 


WATERCOLOUR 


166. WHITE CIRCLE 


(1948) 


11x8'/ 2 


WATERCOLOUR 




167. CENTERED 


(1948) 


ny 2 xi4 


WATERCOLOUR 


&#' rim 


168. CIBERO 


(1948) 


9y 8 xiiy 8 


WATERCOLOUR 




169. RED CIRCLE #11 


(1948) 


i5y 2 xiiy 2 


WATERCOLOUR 


170. CONSTAMENTE 


(1948) 


7x10 


WATERCOLOUR 




171. PURPLE RIOT 


(1948) 


10x63/ 4 


WATERCOLOUR 


172. EMBRANZO 


(1948) 


10V,x73/ 8 


WATERCOLOUR 


1 


173. BLACK SQUARE 


(1948) 


9x83/ 4 


WATERCOLOUR 


174. BLUE CIRCLE 








^ • 


#6 
175. RED CIRCLE 


(1948) 
(1948) 


111/4X141/8 

6x7'/ 4 


WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 


'"4 


176. BROWN CIRCLE 


(1948) 


i33/ 4 xiiy 2 


WATERCOLOUR 




177. THREE CIRCLES 


(1948) 


iiy 2 x8% 


WATERCOLOUR l 


YRICAL INVENTION (1939) 17 x 13, Collage 


178. SPACE 


(1948) 


12x8'/ 2 


WATERCOLOUR 




179. SCHERZO 


(1948) 


5'/ 2 x8'/ 2 


WATERCOLOUR 




180. COMPOSITION 










#83 


(1948) 


8%xll3/ 4 


WATERCOLOUR 




181. CONTRASTS 


(1948) 


6>/ 2 x8</ 2 


WATERCOLOUR 




182. ALTROCHE 


(1948) 


63/ 4 x93/ 4 


WATERCOLOUR 




183. IMPROVISATION 


(1948) 


9y 2 xll % 


WATERCOLOUR 




184. WHITE CIRCLE 


(1948) 


9x12 


WATERCOLOUR 




185. CUBES 


(1948) 


6x9 


WATERCOLOUR 




186. RING 


(1948) 


9x12 


WATERCOLOUR 




187. YELLOW 










TRIANGLE 
188. TRIANGLE 


(1948) 
(1948) 


9y 2 xl2 
9x12 


WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 


r **£ ' 


189. ANDANTE 


(1948) 


9x12 


WATERCOLOUR 


i 


190. YELLOW CHEER 


(1948) 


6x9 


WATERCOLOUR 


j£k 


191. BLUE CIRCLE 


(1948) 


10'/ 2 x7 


WATERCOLOUR 


"§£ 


192. WATERCOLOUR 


(1948) 


ioy 2 x7 


WATERCOLOUR 




193. BLACK SQUARE 


(1948) 


10x7'/ 2 


WATERCOLOUR 


194. POINTS 


(1948) 


7x10 


WATERCOLOUR 


■5^ 


195. YELLOW CIRCLE 


(1948) 


9x12 


WATERCOLOUR 


*~? '. ^fe 


196. CONTRASTS 


(1948) 


lixiiy, 


WATERCOLOUR 




197. AUINDO 


(1948) 


13'/ 2 xll 


WATERCOLOUR 


3RAZIOSO (1945) 17 x 1 5, Collage 



• 








• 


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* 








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• 






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p « 








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A 


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$. 


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LEGGERO (1945) 



17 x 15, Collage 




PRESTO (1945) 



20 



19 x 15, Collage 



198. YELLOW AND 

BLUE (1948) 

199. STELLA (1948) 

200. CALLING (1948) 

201. COMPOSITION 

202. COSMIC CENTER 

203. DELICATE 

204. SENSITIVE (1938) 

205. COMPOSITION 

206. LILAC SYMPHONIC 

207. PIZZICATO 

208. RONDINO 

209. SCHERZO 

210. SCHERZO #2 

211. MORCEAU 

212. MOVING 

213. SELF PORTRAIT 
(As a Child) 

214. SELF PORTRAIT 
(Asa Young Girl) 

215. SELF PORTRAIT 

216. LE MANDARIN 

217. VEIL 

218. L'OISEAU 

219. RED CROSS 

220. LADY AND FLOWERS 

221. COLLISION OF WORLD 

222. TWO RINGS 

223. ALLEGRO 

224. REMINISCENCE 

225. UPWARD 

226. COMPOSITION #5 

227. COLLAGE 



ioy 4 xii3/ 4 

13'/ 2 xll 

8>/ 4 x7 

11x13% 

9x15 

7y 8 x7% 

6x4'/ 2 

11x13 

18x11 

ioy 2 xi4y 2 

6x8 

13'/ 2 xl7 

10xl3'/ 2 

10x11 

12x16 

12'/ 2 x93/ e 

liy 4 x83/ 4 

18x22 

163/ 4 xl2 

16'/ 2 xl33/ 4 

133/ 4 xl7 

9x12 

123/4x171/, 

14x17 

13V 2 xl7 

13'/ 2 xl7 

ll'/ 2 x9 

17x1 3 1/ 2 

83/ 4 xll3/ 8 
83/ 4 xll3/ 4 



WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

COLLAGE 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 

WATERCOLOUR 
AND CRAYON 

WATERCOLOUR 
COLLAGE 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 
WATERCOLOUR 

PENCIL 

PENCIL 

OIL 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE 

WATERCOLOUR 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE 

COLLAGE 



228 


PHANTASY 


113/ 8 x83/ 4 


COLLAGE 


229 


CHEERFUL 


Il%x8% 


WATERCOLOUR 


230 


SYMPHONY IN 








A MAJOR 


12>/ 2 xl4'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


231 


YELLOW 


9%xl2'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


232 


COMPOSITION #12 


14'/ 2 xl0'/ 2 


WATERCOLOUR 


233 


INTERSECTED 








COMPOSITION 


10xl03/ 4 


WATERCOLOUR 


234. 


COLLAGE 


17x93/ 4 




235. 


NOCTURNE 


10x10% 


WATERCOLOUR 


236. 


BLUE AND GREEN 


3%x4% 


WATERCOLOUR 


237. 


ENJOYMENT 


4%x6% 


COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 


238. 


INTERMEZZO 


6%x4% 


WATERCOLOUR 


239. 


PRELUDE -74 


4y 2 x33/ 4 


WATERCOLOUR 


240. 


SCHERZO *76 


4%xSV5 


COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 


241. 


COMPOSITION 


6'/ 2 x4 


COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 


242. 


FUGUE 1 #73 


4'/ 2 x4% 


COLLAGE AND 
WATERCOLOUR 


243. 


COMPOSITION = 10 


14'/ 2 xl03/ 4 


WATERCOLOUR 


244. 


ANDANTE =27 


8x5 


WATERCOLOUR 


245. 


RED CENTER 


12x18 


WATERCOLOUR 


246. 


BACCHUS 


18x11 


COLLAGE 


247. 


WISTFUL 


17x14 


COLLAGE 


248. 


L'ETE 


18x14 


COLLAGE 


249. 


TETE 


17x14 


COLLAGE 


250. 


THE FAN 


17'/ 2 xl4 


COLLAGE 


251. 


LA LOGE 


14xl3'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


252. 


FUGUE 


16xl2'/ 2 


COLLAGE 


253. 


ORCHID 


13'/ 2 xl7'/ 4 


COLLAGE 


254. 


L'OISEAU 


17y 2 xl4 


COLLAGE 


255. 


SUBDUED 


13'/ 2 xl0 


WATERCOLOUR 



rff/^ 


\lf 




M / 


i 

. /: 


1 
HUB *&W 


EARLY ABSTRACTIONS AND COLLAGES ARE NOT DATED 


21 







HILLA REBAY (1929) 



Photograph by Moholy Nagy 





SENSITIVE (1918) 



6x4, Watercolour 



23 








LEADING (1945) 



15 x 20, Walercolour 



24 





HMIa Re bay's "Sleeping Child," made in Florence, Italy, proves 
very well that the non-objective painter can draw. 



25 



"Attach your eyesight to the visionary rhythm 
and do not search for the materialistic 
delusion of matter." 

Hilla Rebay 



■ It IV 1 




1 !l 






1 ••« • / 


• ••• 




■ '". 


*<M' m /rf\\ 


"*. ^ 


jk ■ /, \\\ \t\ ' ■ ■ 



SCHERZO (1945) I 7 x 1 5, Collage 



'Creative Painting at last — The Art of the 
past was merely part of a development that 
finally culminated in the camera" — One 
of thousands of intelligent public comments 
made in the Museum of Non-Objective 
Painting. 



28 




ARTIST BEFORE ABSTRACTIONS IN 1929 IN NEW YORK CITY 



29 




COLLAGE (1917) 



7%x9% 



30 




COLLAGE (1916) 



31 




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